Iranian pistachios include many local name and each name represent a region shape or quality type. However in term of shapes there are in four main groups. All types can be founded in Iran market in raw or roasted with several production offers such as mechanically, opened or closed pistachio, roasted and salted, roasted and salted with added lime.

Ahmad Aghaei:

This nut is rather large and its fruit is almond shaped. It can be harvested in late September. The newest commercial variety, very popular with the farmers, because of high yield and its shorter time to reach production. It is very popular in some markets like India and Greece. Production of this variety is increasing. It also has the whitest shell hue among the four. Available sizes of Iranian Long Pistachio are 20/22, 22-24 and 24/26, with 18/20 also available in small quantities. Pistachio size unit is the number of nuts in one once.

Kalleh Ghoochi:

This nut is famous for being large. It is sensitive to shortage of water and its leaves are complex. This type of nut is vulnerable to cold weather in spring. It can be harvested in mid September.
On the whole Kalleh Ghoochi is not being budded anymore and production is from existing trees. Although commercially quite successful, Kalleh Ghoochi trees showed a steep drop in growth and production as they grew older than 40 years old. It is expected that the production would slowly decline. Available sizes are 20/22, 22/24 and 24/26, with 18/20 being available in small quantities.

Fandoghi:

This cultivar is the most widely available pistachio variety and grows in most pistachio growing areas of Iran. Fandoghi is of round type and has the lowest shape index among the four cultivars. In recent years, around 50% of Iranian production is of the Fandoghi type. The reason is its limited yield, the new orchards are seldom planted with this variety. It comes in the following sizes 28/30, 30/32 and 32/34 nuts per ounce. Size 26/28 is also available in small quantities.

Akbari:

This type is the highest economic value. Its fruits are large and almond shaped. It can be harvested in late September. This is a newer variety with good yield and with long, large nuts.

 

The English name pistachio is derived from “Pisteh”, which is a Persian name. Also known as the green almond. Pistachio nuts are intertwined with Iranian culture and are actually present in all facets of Iranian life. Pistachio nuts get a mention in all Iranian literature, stories, beliefs, traditions and rituals such as Norooz (New Iranian Year) and Yalda festival are even consumed in weddings and funerals. Iranian poets and literary figures have also referred to pistachio nuts in their works. For Iranians no festivities and feasts can be held without pistachio nuts as well as other nuts like walnuts, almond, raisin, hazelnuts, etc. They celebrate Iranian New Year by eating pistachios. If they cook special dishes, they decorate them with pistachios. Even treats such as ‘Gaz’ contain pistachios. Pistachio nuts are of strategic importance among Iranian producers of agricultural products.

There is no doubt that Iranian pistachio has the best taste and maximum nutrition. The special climate of Kerman province is the only best place for growing pistachios. Iranian pistachios offer various advantages that set them apart from other types of pistachio in the world. Higher meat content offers better value for money. Iranian pistachios have a world-famous taste that is unrivaled. This taste advantage is enhanced by roasting Iranian pistachios at higher temperatures, made possible by higher unsaturated oil content. This high temperature roasting eliminates any bacterial contamination, which may be present in raw product.

 

Love Loura pistachios? You have another reason to have these tree nuts if your sugar levels are high as eating pistachios may reduce vascular response to stress in type 2 diabetes.

“In adults with diabetes, two servings of pistachios per day lowered vascular constriction during stress and improved neural control of the heart,” said Sheila G. West, a professor of bio-behavioral health and nutritional sciences at Pennsylvania State University.

Although nuts are high in fat, they contain good fats, fiber, potassium and antioxidants.

“Given the high risk of heart disease in people with diabetes, nuts are an important component of a heart healthy diet in this population,” West added.

During the investigation on patients with type 2 diabetes about the effects of pistachios, researchers randomized patients to one of two test diets.

Test diets included a standard heart-healthy diet – 27 percent fat and seven percent saturated fat – and a diet containing two servings per day of pistachios – about 3 ounces or 20 percent of calories from pistachio nuts.

The typical research participant consumed about 150 pistachio nuts per day.

The pistachio diet contained 33 percent fat and 7 percent saturated fat.

“After the pistachio diet, blood vessels remained more relaxed and open during the stress tests,” West said.

They found that systolic blood pressure during sleep was particularly affected by pistachios.

“Average sleep blood pressure was reduced by about four points and this would be expected to lower workload on the heart,” West noted.

The researchers also recorded improvements in heart rate variability, a measure of how well the nervous system controls heart function.

The results appeared in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Source: IANS

 

PISTACHIO;
A Symbol, An Identity, A History of Iran.
And now we are going to restore the real position of Iranian Pistachio.
We want to introduce the natural taste, natural shape, natural pistachio.
Hey California, Mama is coming back
We are so proud of introducing the super star in the nuts world:
Loura Pistachio
You will find the taste of smile, this is our mission …

 

Yalda is an Iranian festival celebrated on the longest and darkest night of the year, that is, in the night of the Northern Hemisphere’s winter solstice. Calendarically, it is celebrated in the night between the last day of the ninth month (Azar) and the first day of the tenth month (Dey) of the Iranian civil calendar, which corresponds to the night of December 20 or 21 each year.

The longest and darkest night of the year is a time when friends and family gather together to eat and read poetry (especially Hafez) until well after midnight. Fruits and nuts are eaten and pomegranates and watermelons are particularly significant. The red color in these fruits symbolizes the crimson hues of dawn and glow of life. The poems of Divan-e-Hafez, which can be found in the bookcases of most Iranians families, are intermingled with peoples’ life and are read or recited during various occasions like this festival and at Nowruz.

The longest and darkest night of the year marks “the night opening the initial forty-day period of the three-month winter”, from which the name Chella, “forty”, derives. There are all together three 40-day periods, one in summer, and two in winter. ‘Yaldā’, is a borrowing from Syriac[rs 1] and is “connected with Christianity”. In the 1st-3rd centuries, significant numbers of Eastern Christians settled in Arsacid and Sassanid territories, where they had received protection from religious persecution. Through them, Western Iranians (i.e. Parthians, Persians etc.) came in contact with Christian religious observances, including, it seems, Nestorian Christian Yalda, which in Syriac (a Middle Aramaic dialect) literally means “birth” but was also one of the Syriac words for Christmas, which — because it fell nine months after Annunciation — was celebrated on eve of the winter solstice. Although it is not clear when and where the Syriac word was adopted into Persian, gradually ‘Shab-e Yalda’ and ‘Shab-e Cheleh’ became synonymous and the two are used interchangeably.

Shab-e Chella was officially added to Iran’s List of National Treasures in a special ceremony in 2008.

In pre-Islamic Zoroastrian tradition the longest and darkest night of the year was a particularly inauspicious day, and the practices of what is now known as “Shab-e Chelleh/Yalda” were originally customs intended to protect people from evil during that long night. People were advised to stay awake most of the night, lest misfortune should befall them, and people would then gather in the safety of groups of friends and relatives, share the last remaining fruits from the summer, and find ways to pass the long night together in good company. The next day (i.e. the first day of Dey month) was then a day of celebration, and (at least in the 10th century, as recorded by Al-Biruni), the festival of the first day of Dey month was known as Ḵorram-ruz (joyful day) or Navad-ruz (ninety days [left to Nowruz]). Although the religious significance of the long dark night have been lost, the old traditions of staying up late in the company of friends and family have been retained in Iranian culture to the present day.

References to other older festivals held around the winter solstice are known from both Middle Persian texts as well as texts of the early Islamic period. In the 10th century, Al-Biruni mentions an Adar Jashan festival of fire celebrated on the intersection of Azar day (9th) of Azar month (9th), which is the last autumn month. This was probably the same as the fire festival called Shahrevaragan (Shahrivar day of Shahrivar month), which marked the beginning of winter in Tokarestan. Sufism’s Chella, which is a 40-day period of retreat and fasting, is not related to winter solstice festival.

Food plays a central role in the present-day form of the celebrations. In most parts of Iran the extended family come together and enjoy a fine dinner. A wide variety of fruits and sweetmeats specifically prepared or kept for this night are served. Foods common to the celebration include watermelon, pomegranate, nuts and dried fruit like salted and roasted pistachio. These items and more are commonly placed on a korsi, which people sit around. In some areas it is custom that forty varieties of edibles should be served during the ceremony of the night of Chelleh.

Light-hearted superstitions run high on the night of Chelleh. These superstitions, however, are primarily associated with consumption. For instance, it is believed that consuming watermelons on the night of Chelleh will ensure the health and well-being of the individual during the months of summer by protect­ing him from falling victim to excessive heat or disease produced by hot humors. In Khorasan, there is a belief that whoever eats carrots, pears, pomegranates, and green olives will be protected against the harmful bite of insects, especially scorpions. Eating garlic on this night protects one against pains in the joints. Placing one’s mouth near a donkey’s ear and whispering into its ear is certain to cure any ailment, while mixing camel fat and mare’s milk and burning them will protect from insects the place where the smoke from this concoction penetrates.

After dinner the older indi­viduals entertain the others by telling them tales and anecdotes. Another favorite and prevalent pastime of the night of Chelleh is divination by the Dīvān of Hafez (fāl-e Hafez). It is believed that one should not divine by the Dīvān of Hafez more than three times, however, or the poet may get angry.

Activities common to the festival include staying up past midnight, conversation, eating, reading poems out loud, telling stories and jokes and for some dancing. Prior to invention and prevalence of electricity, decorating and lighting the house and yard with candles was also part of the tradition, but few have continued this tradition. Another tradition is giving dried fruits and nuts to family and friends, wrapped in tulle and tied with ribbon.

Another tradition is giving dried fruits and nuts to family and friends, wrapped in tulle and tied with ribbon.

Another custom performed in certain parts of Iran on the night of Chelleh involves young engaged couples. The men send an edible arrangement containing seven kinds of fruits and a variety of gifts to their fiancees on this night. In some areas, the girl and her family return the favor by sending gifts back for the young man.

 
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Loura, The Taste of Smile